Posted by: APO | 9 October 2007

UN – HIGHLIGHTS OF THE NOON BRIEFING

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE NOON BRIEFING

BY MICHELE MONTAS
SPOKESPERSON FOR SECRETARY-GENERAL BAN KI-MOON

Tuesday, October 9, 2007

CLASHES REPORTED IN SOUTH DARFUR TOWN

  • The UN Mission in Sudan, citing initial reports it has received, has reported that clashes took place yesterday in and around the town of Muhajariya in South Darfur between the SLA (Sudan Liberation Army)/Minni Minawi faction and forces suspected to be tribal militia.
     
  • The mission did not have further information on the circumstances of the fighting nor on possible casualties.
     
  • Meanwhile, the UN Special Envoy for Darfur Jan Eliasson is back in Khartoum to meet with Government officials, members of civil society and other stakeholders in the upcoming peace negotiations on Darfur scheduled in Libya.

 
 

EX-MILITIA LEADERS ARE SENTENCED BY SIERRA LEONE SPECIAL COURT

  • Two former leaders of Sierra Leone’s Civil Defense Forces (CDF) militia have received prison sentences following their convictions in August for war crimes committed during the country’s decade-long civil conflict, according to a press release issued by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.
     
  • Justice Itoe said that while both Prosecution and Defence had recommended single, “global” sentences, the Court had decided to hand down separate sentences on each count for which the two accused had been found guilty.

FINAL CONVOY OF CONGOLESE REFUGEES LEAVES BANGUI, C.A.R.

  • The UN Refugee Agency has wrapped up a 3-year long phased repatriation programme for Congolese refugees in the Central African Republic. A final convoy of some 130 Congolese refugees left the host country’s capital, Bangui, this weekend for the region around Kinshasa.
     
  • The operation began in 2004 but was repeatedly disrupted due to widespread insecurity. Since then a total of 135,000 Congolese refugees have been sent back home from neighboring countries, 43,000 since the start of this year. Even so, some 312,000 remain in refugee camps in Tanzania, Zambia and Rwanda.

 AIRLIFTED FOOD SUPPLIES RUNNING SCARCE
FOR FLOOD-AFFECTED UGANDANS

  • The World Food Programme (WFP) is warning that it is running out of food for hundreds of thousands of Ugandans affected by floods. WFP has been airlifting food and other assistance by helicopter to marooned communities, but says supplies will run out in December if it doesn’t receive any new contributions.
     
  • The agency still needs more than $20 million to buy food and to provide trucks, boats, aircraft and emergency road and bridge repairs. To date, WFP has only received one fifth of that amount.
     
  • Elsewhere in Africa, WFP is also feeding people affected by floods in Ghana and Togo.  The Central Emergency Response Fund, meanwhile, has allocated almost $4 million for flood survivors in Ghana, Togo and Mali since August. 

 OTHER ANNOUNCEMENTS


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