Statement by Mr Toby Lanzer, Humanitarian Coordinator in South Sudan / Devastating cycle of violence and revenge in South Sudan must end

 

JUBA, South Sudan, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ “I am deeply saddened and frustrated by the violence that has ravaged Bentiu and Bor in the past 72 hours. There is no excuse for direct attacks on civilians, or on those risking their own lives to protect them.

 

These events show, yet again, the pointlessness of the violence engulfing South Sudan. The current cycle of revenge will get the people of this country nowhere. It wrecks the present, and casts a dark shadow over what should have been a very bright future.

 

I call on the parties to the conflict to immediately cease hostilities and resume meaningful negotiations to find a political solution to their differences. And I call on the wisdom and compassion of all South Sudanese, from all the diverse communities that make up this country, to do whatever they can to put an end to the fighting, before more innocent men, women and children are lost.”

 

SOURCE 

UNITED NATIONS


 

FY 2014 Funding Opportunity Announcement for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees and Asylum Seekers in South Africa

 

WASHINGTON, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ Funding Opportunity Announcement

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

April 16, 2014

 

 

Funding Opportunity Number: PRM-PRMOAPAF-14-013-049361

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number:

19.517 – Overseas Refugee Assistance Programs for Africa

Announcement issuance date: Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Proposal submission deadline: Friday, May 30, 2014 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

**ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website http://www.Grants.gov. PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal early to allow time to address any difficulties that may arise.**

There have been changes in requirements for PRM proposals, and the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We strongly encourage all organizations to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for information and resources to ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM expects all NGOs applying for funding to have read and comply with PRM’s NGO guidelines. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

Eligible Applicants: (1) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; (2) Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and (3) International Organizations. International multilateral organizations, such as United Nations agencies, should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Funding Opportunity Announcement. Multilateral organizations that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should contact the relevant PRM Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

Proposed program start dates: July 1 – September 1, 2014

Duration of Activity: No more than 12 months.

Current Funding Priorities for refugees and asylum seekers in South Africa:

PRM will prioritize funding for proposed NGO activities that best meet the priorities of the Bureau and of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) for protection of and assistance to refugees and asylum seekers in urban centers in South Africa. The parameters for funding and the sectoral priorities are identified below.

(a) Proposed activities should support refugees and asylum seekers residing in South Africa with priority areas being urban areas such as Cape Town, Durban, Johannesburg, Port Elizabeth, and Pretoria. Urban programs should, where relevant, include efforts to: identify and reach out to “hidden” refugees, identify and build upon existing services, provide information about and referrals to existing services, including government services, establish a clear method and criteria for identifying and assisting the most vulnerable, adopt a community-based approach that takes account of host community needs, and avoid creating refugee-specific, parallel services to what already exists in the community wherever possible/appropriate.

(b) NGOs applying for funding must demonstrate a working relationship with UNHCR. A letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities is strongly recommended. This letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address. Priority will be given to NGOs that can demonstrate they have coordinated with UNHCR how the proposed activities would be implemented.

(c) Proposals should focus on advocacy and support for refugee protection and access to basic social services in urban settings in one or more of the following sectors:

•    Protection: Proposal should bear in mind existing refugee protection mechanisms including formal laws and policies designed to protect refugees and asylum seekers as well as informal community-based protection efforts. Proposals should be designed to support and strengthen existing protection mechanisms rather than develop parallel systems that may not be sustainable over time. Key components of protection programs may include: (1) legal assistance and counseling, (2) community-based prevention and response to xenophobia, (3) prevention and response to gender-based violence, (4) child protection, and (5) dissemination of information to promote enhanced refugee access to protection mechanisms and programs.

•    Assistance: Proposals should focus on increasing refugee and asylum seeker access to existing government- and community-based social services rather than developing parallel services, with a focus on (a) health care (including mental health care and sexual and reproductive health services), (b) education and vocational training, and (c) housing and shelter. Proposals may include support to host communities who are assisting and protecting refugees and asylum seekers provided at least 50 percent of the beneficiaries are refugees and asylum seekers.

•    Livelihoods: Proposals should be designed to foster self-reliance among refugees and asylum seekers in urban areas. Components may include (a) market assessments, (b) training in language, literacy and vocational skills linked to local markets, (c) job-placement, (d) micro-enterprise support, and (e) legal support for businesses. Programs may include host-community beneficiaries provided that at least 50 percent of the beneficiaries are refugees and asylum seekers.

(d) Coordination with host government authorities and UNHCR as well as with other local and international NGOs active in the same area and sector is essential. NGOs submitting proposals and/or their implementing partners should be registered to operate with the South African government at the time of their submission to PRM. All applicants should provide documentation verifying their registration status as an attachment to their proposal submission.

(e) As nearly all target beneficiaries of this RFP will reside in urban areas, NGOs are strongly encouraged to consult PRM’s urban principles and other relevant urban programming guidance, including UNHCR operational guidance on livelihoods and health care in urban areas. Proposals should indicate how the proposed assistance would fill an identified gap, why that gap is a priority, as well as how the gap and the beneficiaries were identified.

(f) All proposals must adhere to PRM Standardized Indicators for health and livelihoods projects. Detailed information about PRM’s Standardized Indicator Initiative is provided in section C of our General NGO Guidelines. Proposals should include their own custom indicators in addition to SPHERE minimum standard indicators where relevant.

(g) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective; objectives should be clearly linked to the sectors.

(h) Proposals must adhere to relevant international standards for humanitarian assistance. See PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of sector-specific standards including guidance on proposals for projects in urban areas.

(i) PRM strongly encourages programs that target the needs of potentially vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; stateless persons; and other minorities) and can demonstrate what steps have been taken to meet the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of these vulnerable groups effectively. NOTE: PRM partners must now complete a gender analysis (see PRM proposal template, section 3a) that briefly analyzes (1) gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys); (2) associated risks and implementation challenges for the project posed by those dynamics; and (3) how program activities will mitigate these protection risks and be made accessible to vulnerable groups (particularly women and girls). A gender analysis is a requirement prior to PRM making a final funding award.

(j) PRM will accept proposals from any NGO working in the above mentioned sectors although, given budgetary constraints, priority will be given to proposals from organizations that can demonstrate:

•    a working relationship with UNHCR, current UNHCR funding, and/or a letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities and/or overall country program (this letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address);

•    a proven track record in providing proposed assistance both in the sector and specified location;

•    evidence of coordination with international organizations (IOs) and other (local and international) NGOs working in the same area or sector as well as – where possible – local government authorities and/or relevant ministries or government entities;

•    a strong transition plan involving local capacity-building;

•    support and capacity-building for local and refugee community-based organizations;

•    where applicable, adherence to PRM’s Principles for Refugee Protection in Urban Areas available online at http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/187237.pdf.

•    a budget that demonstrates co-funding by non-US government sources.

Failure to adhere to the guidelines above and the General NGO Guidelines will disqualify an application.

Funding Limits: Project proposals should be no less than $100,000 and no more than $300,000 or they will be disqualified.

As stated in PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, PRM looks favorably on cost-sharing efforts and seeks to support projects with a diverse donor base and/or resources from the submitting organization. The proposal budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other U.S. government agencies, other donors, and your own organization.

**Proposal Submission Requirements: Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov.

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements (http://test.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/applicant-resources.html).

Please note the following highlights:

•    Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S.-based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). To register with Grants.gov, organizations must first receive a DUNS number and register with the System for Award Management (SAM) at http://www.sam.gov which can take weeks and sometimes months. We recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

•    Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

•    If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at support@grants.gov or by calling 1-800-518-4726. Applicants who are unable to submit applications via Grants.gov due to Grants.gov technical difficulties and who have reported the problem to the Grants.gov help desk, received a case number, and had a service request opened to research the problem, should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer to determine whether an alternative method of submission is appropriate.

•    Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found at: http://fa.statebuy.state.gov/content.asp?content_id=161&menu_id=68 )

Proposal Content, Formatting and Template: This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, which contain additional administrative information on proposal content and formatting, and explain in detail PRM’s NGO funding strategy and priorities. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your proposal submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

PRM strongly recommends using the proposal and budget templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Please send an email, with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line, to PRM’s NGO Coordinator.

Single-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 20 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 15 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total. However annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process.

To be considered for PRM funding, organizations must submit a complete application package including

•    Proposal reflecting objectives and indicators for each year of the program period.

•    Budget and budget narrative for each year of the program period.

•    Signed completed SF-424.

In addition, proposal submissions to PRM should include the following information:

•    Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.

•    To increase PRM’s ability to track the impact of PRM funding, include specific information on locations of projects and beneficiaries (GPS coordinates if possible).

•    Proposals should outline how the NGO will acknowledge PRM funding. If an organization believes that publicly acknowledging the receipt of USG funding for a particular PRM-funded project could potentially endanger the lives of the beneficiaries and/or the organization staff, invite suspicion about the organization’s motives, or alienate the organization from the population it is trying to help, it must provide a brief explanation in its proposal as to why it should be exempted from this requirement.

•    The budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other USG agencies, other donors, and your own organization. PRM strongly encourages multilateral support for humanitarian programs.

•    In FY 2014, PRM is asking applicants whose proposals address gender-based violence (GBV) through their projects to estimate the total cost of these activities as a separate line item in their proposed budgets. PRM’s budget template document has been updated to reflect this new requirement.

•    Gender analysis (See above. Required before an award can be made).

•    Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made).

•    Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

•    Proposals and budgets should include details of any sub-agreements associated with the program.

•    Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

•    NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number.

Reports and Reporting Requirements:

Organizations will be required to submit Program and Financial Reports throughout the course of the program period and at its end. Please Review Section 5 of General NGO Guidelines.

Proposal Review Process: PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel will evaluate submissions based on the above-referenced proposal evaluation criteria and PRM priorities in the context of available funding.

PRM may request revised proposals and/or budgets based on feedback from the panel. PRM will provide formal notifications to NGOs of final decisions taken by Bureau management.

Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated bureau Authorizing Official as described in the proposal templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:

•    As a condition of receipt of this assistance award, all materials produced pursuant to the award, including training materials, materials for recipients or materials to communicate or promote with foreign audiences a program, event, project, or some other activity under this agreement, including but not limited to invitations to events, press materials, event backdrops, podium signs, etc. must be marked appropriately with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity. Subrecipients and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the recipient shall include a provision in the subrecipient agreement indicating that the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement. In the event the recipient does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action.

PRM Points of Contact: Should NGOs have technical questions related to this announcement, they should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. Please note that responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.

For Procedural Questions: Please contact PRM’s NGO Coordinator: PRMNGOCoordinator@state.gov or 202-453-9364

PRM Program Office Contact, Washington: Please contact PRM/AFR Deputy Director Mary Lange: langemm@state.gov or 202-453-9369

 

SOURCE 

US Department of State


 

WHO ramps up to address Ebola challenges; prevent new infections / Protecting health workers one of top priorities

 

CONAKRY, Guinea, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ As the Ebola outbreak continues to evolve in Guinea and Liberia, WHO continues to expand its activities by sending additional expertise to assist in all areas of the response.

Currently more than 65public health experts are working with WHO and its Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) partners are working with WHO on the ground supporting Ministries of Health and other partners in the two countries to provide clinical management of patients, contact tracing, disease surveillance, laboratory work, logistics, as well as communications and sharing of information to help people living in communities protect themselves from the disease.

To date, more than 220 patients have become ill in the region about 135have died. More than 100 are laboratory confirmed to be Ebola. Although it is not the largest outbreak ever, given its spread across two countries, the current Ebola outbreak in Guinea and Liberia is one of the most challenging WHO and its partners have ever faced. For example, tracing people the ill have come in contact with requires following more than 640 people in 6 areas in Guinea and 4 in Liberia, and sometimes across the borders of the two countries.

In addition to caring for the current patients, new infections must be prevented in order to contain the outbreak. Raising awareness of the risk factors for infection and the protective measures that should be taken is the only way to stop transmission and subsequent deaths. Close unprotected physical contact with Ebola patients should be avoided, and those who have died from the disease should be promptly and safely buried.

“One of priority areas of work is to train health care workers in affected countries on how they can protect themselves as they provide care for the sick” says Pierre Formenty, one of WHO’s technical officers specialized in Ebola. “So far in Guinea, 24 health workers have been affected including 13 deaths. Because Ebola outbreaks have not occurred in this area before, many health workers are not practiced in caring for these patients. Protecting their health is crucial to succeeding in the control of this Ebola outbreak.”

In Conakry, public health experts from WHO, GOARN and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) are supporting national medical and nursing staff at the Donka Hospital to strengthen patient triage and care, case management and infection prevention and control.

Training on the safe handling of patients with Ebola and the deceased is also organized for staff working at the morgue, and for drivers and staff transporting patients. A training of trainers activity for the directors of all 20 health Centres in Conakry is planned this week as well as for health workers from non-affected regions of Guinea (Lola, Yomou, Beyla et Nzérékoré).

Similar work is underway in Liberia, where the WHO and the GOARN team has conducted visits to two hospitals in Montserrado County, and trainings in patient triage and care and infection prevention and control.

Ebola can have a case fatality rate of up to 90%, and is a severe acute viral illness. No vaccine is available, nor is there any specific treatment. It is characterized by sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache, nausea and sore throat. This can be followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding.Severely ill patients require intensive supportive care. Patients are frequently dehydrated and require oral rehydration with solutions containing electrolytes, or intravenous fluids.

 

SOURCE 

World Health Organization (WHO)


 

Le Canada soutient la santé et les moyens de subsistance durables au Ghana / Le Canada aide le Ghana à diversifier son économie et à améliorer les services de santé et la nutrition

 

OTTAWA, Canada, 17 avril 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ Le sénateur Larry Smith, au nom du ministre du Développement international et de la Francophonie, l’honorable Christian Paradis, a annoncé aujourd’hui la contribution du Canada à un certain nombre d’initiatives de développement au Ghana, dont le Projet de développement des capacités pour la santé et des moyens de subsistance durables.

Grâce à un partenariat avec l’Université McGill, cette nouvelle initiative permettra d’améliorer la sécurité alimentaire, la qualité du régime alimentaire et l’état nutritionnel des femmes et des enfants, mais aussi de diversifier les activités économiques dans les régions rurales du district du Haut-Manya Krobo, au Ghana.

« Le Canada travaille avec les Ghanéens pour les aider à diversifier leur économie et à améliorer les services de santé et la nutrition, en particulier au profit des femmes et des filles, a déclaré le sénateur Smith. Nous sommes fiers d’établir des partenariats avec des établissements universitaires réputés, comme l’Université McGill, afin de donner aux habitants de pays en développement comme le Ghana les moyens nécessaires pour se sortir de la pauvreté et pour vivre en santé et être productifs. »

« L’Université McGill remercie le gouvernement du Canada, car il accorde un soutien généreux et reconnaît que nous réussissons depuis longtemps à faire en sorte que les résultats des travaux de recherche bénéficient à la communauté mondiale, a déclaré pour sa part Rosie Goldstein, vice-principale à la recherche et aux relations internationales. Grâce à de meilleures interventions en matière d’alimentation et de nutrition, ce projet aura des incidences considérables à court et à long terme sur la santé et la vie des enfants et des femmes qui vivent en milieu rural au Ghana. »

Les deux autres initiatives annoncées aujourd’hui sont déjà en cours. Elles amélioreront la sécurité alimentaire et les moyens de subsistance des agriculteurs au Ghana et de leurs familles.

Les faits en bref

•    En 2010, le gouvernement du Canada a appuyé la fondation de l’Institut pour la sécurité alimentaire mondiale de l’Université McGill, afin de contribuer à la formation et au renforcement des capacités en matière de sécurité alimentaire dans les pays en développement.

•    Réalisée en partenariat avec Vision Mondiale Canada et l’Université du Ghana, les collaborateurs principaux, cette nouvelle initiative de l’Université McGill permettra d’améliorer le bien-être économique, la sécurité alimentaire, la nutrition et la santé de 21 000 habitants des régions rurales du district du Haut-Manya Krobo.

•    Les trois projets au Ghana qui ont été annoncés aujourd’hui cadrent bien avec la priorité de développement absolue du gouvernement du Canada, qui consiste à améliorer la santé des mères, des nouveau-nés et des enfants dans les pays en développement.

•    Depuis 1990, le gouvernement du Ghana travaille en étroite collaboration avec la communauté des donateurs pour réduire de moitié le nombre de citoyens qui vivent dans la pauvreté extrême. Toutefois, quelque deux millions de personnes ont toujours un accès limité à la nourriture et les enfants sont particulièrement vulnérables.

 

SOURCE 

Canada – Ministry of Foreign Affairs


 

Canada Supports Sustainable Livelihoods and Health in Ghana / Canada helps Ghana diversify its economy and improve health services and nutrition

 

OTTAWA, Canada, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ Senator Larry Smith, on behalf of the Honourable Christian Paradis, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, announced today Canada’s contribution to a number of development initiatives in Ghana, including the Building Capacity for Sustainable Livelihoods and Health project.

Through a partnership with McGill University, this new initiative will help to improve the food security, dietary quality and nutritional status of women and children, while diversifying economic activities in rural areas of the Upper Manya Krobo District of Ghana.

“Canada is working with the Ghanaians to help diversify their economy and improve health services and nutrition, particularly for women and girls,” said Senator Smith. “We are proud to partner with strong Canadian academic institutions, such as McGill University, to give people in developing countries such as Ghana the tools they need to escape poverty and lead healthy, productive lives.”

“McGill University thanks the Government of Canada for its generous support and for recognizing our strong tradition of successfully mobilizing research results for the benefit of the global community,” said Dr. Rosie Goldstein, Vice-Principal, Research and International Relations. “Through improved food and nutrition interventions, this project will make an enormous impact on the health outcomes and lives of children and women in rural Ghana, now and in the future.”

The other two initiatives announced today are already underway and will improve food security and livelihoods of farmers and their families in Ghana.

Quick Facts

•    In 2010, the Government of Canada supported the launch of the McGill University Institute for Global Food Security to provide training and capacity-building on food security in developing countries.

•    Working in partnership with principal collaborators World Vision Canada and the University of Ghana, the new McGill University initiative will improve the economic well-being, food security, nutrition and health of 21,000 rural residents in the Upper Manya Krobo District.

•    All three projects in Ghana announced today complement the Government of Canada’s top development priority of improving maternal, newborn, and child health in developing countries.

•    Since 1990, the Ghanaian government has worked closely with the donor community to halve the number of citizens living in extreme poverty. However, some two million people still have limited access to food, and children remain particularly vulnerable.

•    Backgrounder: Canada Supports Development Initiatives in Ghana

 

SOURCE 

Canada – Ministry of Foreign Affairs


 

FY 2014 Funding Opportunity Announcement for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in Chad and Cameroon

 

WASHINGTON, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ Funding Opportunity Announcement

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

April 16, 2014

 

 

Funding Opportunity Number: PRM-PRMOAPAF-14-014

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number:

19.517 – Overseas Refugee Assistance Programs for Africa

Announcement issuance date: Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Proposal submission deadline: Friday, May, 16, 2014 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

**ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website Grants.gov. PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal early to allow time to address any difficulties that may arise.**

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher.

Proposed program start dates: August 1, 2014-September 15, 2014

Eligible Applicants: (1) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; (2) Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and (3) International Organizations. International multilateral organizations, such as United Nations agencies, should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Funding Opportunity Announcement. Multilateral organizations that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should contact the PRM Program Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

Duration of Activity: 12 to 24 months

Program plans from 12 to 24 months will be considered. Applicants may submit multi-year proposals with activities and budgets that do not exceed 24 months from the proposed start date. Actual awards will not exceed 12 months in duration and activities and budgets submitted in year one can be revised/updated each year. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting continuation application and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. In funding a project one year, PRM makes no representations that it will continue to fund the project in successive years and encourages applicants to seek a wide array of donors to ensure long-term funding possibilities. Please see Multi-Year Funding section below for additional information.

Current Funding Priorities for refugees in Chad and Cameroon:

PRM will prioritize funding for proposed NGO activities that best meet the Bureau’s priorities for refugees in Chad and Cameroon as identified below.

(a) Proposed activities should primarily support Sudanese refugees residing in the 13 camps in eastern Chad; Central African refugees in the five camps in southern Chad or in UNHCR-designated host communities; or Central African refugees residing in eastern Cameroon. Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those projects that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50% refugees.

(b) Proposals must focus on the following sectors:

•    Health (including reproductive health)

•    Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH)

•    Livelihoods

•    Protection

o    Prevention of and Response to Gender-based Violence

o    Psychosocial Support

o    Child Protection, to include secondary education for Sudanese refugees

Country Specific Instructions

(1) Chad

•    Proposals should focus on Sudanese refugees in the 13 camps in eastern Chad and/or Central African refugees in the nine camps or UNHCR-designated host communities in southern Chad.

•    Proposals may include work in the following areas: Primary health care, including reproductive health; secondary education; prevention of and response to gender-based violence; WASH; and livelihoods.

•    Proposals should include a well-developed plan for training and building the capacity of local staff and service providers as well as building refugee self-sufficiency.

•    Proposal should include a transition plan for long term sustainability of programming.

(2) Cameroon

•    Proposals should focus on new Central African refugees residing in eastern Cameroon. Proposals may include work in the following: prevention of and response to gender-based violence.

(c) PRM Standardized Indicator Initiative:

Health: Proposals focusing on health in camp based settings must include a minimum of one of the four following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

•    Number of consultations/clinician/day (Target: Fewer than 50 patients per clinician per day).

•    Measles vaccination rate for children under five (Target: 95% coverage).

•    Percentage of deliveries attended by a skilled birth attendant in a health care facility (Target: 100%).

•    Percentage of reporting rape survivors given post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with 72 hours (Target: 100%).

NGO proposals seeking to fund service provision may include the following indicators as appropriate:

•    Primary Care: number and percentage of beneficiary patients, by sex and age, receiving primary health care assistance.

•    Emergency Care: number and percentage of beneficiary patients, by sex and age, receiving care for trauma or sudden illness.

Proposals should include custom health indicators in addition to the relevant standardized indicator(s).

Key Resources – Health

•    Sphere Handbook: http://www.sphereproject.org/handbook/

•    UNHCR Health Guidelines, Policies, and Strategies: http://www.unhcr.org/pages/49c3646cdd.html

•    OFDA NGO Guidance (pages 96-110): http://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/1866/guidelines_for_proposals_2012.pdf

Livelihoods: Proposals focusing on livelihoods in camp-based settings must include a minimum of one of the three following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

Camp-Based Settings:

•    Number of project beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) receiving training on appropriate skills as determined by market and livelihood assessments. This may include language and skills training, entrepreneurship building, financial literacy, business support services, job placement and apprenticeship schemes, and/or legal aid.

•    Number and percentage of program participants, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) reporting higher household income level by end of project period as compared to the pre-project baseline assessment.

•    (Temporary Employment) Number of beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) participating in cash or food for work programs.

Proposals should include custom livelihoods indicators in addition to the relevant standardized indicator(s).

Key Resources – Livelihoods

•    USAID/OFDA Guidelines for Proposals, October 2012 (pgs. 82-96)

•    Women’s Refugee Commission, Preventing Gender Based Violence, Building Livelihoods: Guidance and Tools for Improved Programming

•    Minimum Economic Recovery Standards, 2nd ed. Washington, DC, USA: The SEEP Network, 2010. http://communities.seepnetwork.org/econrecovery

•    Emergency Market Mapping and Analysis Toolkit. (EMMA) Practical Action Publishing. 2010. http://www.emmatoolkit.info (In French as of 2011.)

•    Local Economic Recovery in Post-Conflict: Guidelines. Geneva: ILO, 2010.

http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_emp/documents/instructionalmaterial/wcms_141270.pdf

(d) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound, and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective; objectives should be clearly linked to the sectors.

(e) Proposals must adhere to relevant international standards for humanitarian assistance. See PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of sector-specific standards including new guidance on proposals for projects in urban areas.

(f) PRM strongly encourages programs that target the needs of vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; and other minorities) and can demonstrate what steps have been taken to meet the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of these vulnerable groups effectively. NOTE: PRM partners must now complete a gender analysis (see PRM proposal template, section 3a) that briefly analyzes (1) gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys); (2) associated risks and implementation challenges for the project posed by those dynamics; and (3) how program activities will mitigate these protection risks and be made accessible to vulnerable groups (particularly women and girls). A gender analysis is a requirement prior to PRM making a final funding award.

(g) PRM will accept proposals from any NGO working in the above mentioned sectors although, given budgetary constraints, priority will be given to proposals from organizations that can demonstrate:

•    a working relationship with UNHCR, current UNHCR funding, and/or a letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities and/or overall country program (this letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address);

•    a proven track record in providing proposed assistance both in the sector and specified location;

•    evidence of coordination with international organizations (IOs) and other NGOs working in the same area or sector as well as – where possible – local authorities;

•    a strong transition plan, where feasible, involving local capacity-building;

•    where applicable, adherence to PRM’s Principles for Refugee Protection in Urban Areas available online at http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/187237.pdf.

•    a budget that demonstrates co-funding by non-U.S. government sources.

Funding Limits: Project proposals must not be less than $250,000 and not more than $2.5 million or they will be disqualified. As stated in PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, PRM looks favorably on cost-sharing efforts and seeks to support projects with a diverse donor base and/or resources from the submitting organization.

Proposal Submission Requirements: Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov (not via GrantSolutions.gov). If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements (http://test.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/applicant-resources.html).

Please note the following highlights:

•    Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S. based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). To register with Grants.gov, organizations must first receive a DUNS number and register with the System for Award Management (SAM) at http://www.sam.gov which can take weeks and sometimes months. We recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

•    Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

•    If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at support@grants.gov or by calling 1-800-518-4726. Applicants who are unable to submit applications via Grants.gov due to Grants.gov technical difficulties and who have reported the problem to the Grants.gov help desk, received a case number, and had a service request opened to research the problem, should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer to determine whether an alternative method of submission is appropriate.

•    Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found at: https://www.statebuy.state.gov/fa/Documents/Listofoverseascertsandassurances.pdf.

Proposal Content, Formatting and Template: This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, which contain additional administrative information on proposal content and formatting, and explain in detail PRM’s NGO funding strategy and priorities. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your proposal submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

PRM strongly recommends using the proposal and budget templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Please send an email, with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line, to PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Single-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 20 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 15 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process.

To be considered for PRM funding, organizations must submit a complete application package including:

•    Proposal reflecting objectives and indicators for each year of the program period.

•    Budget and budget narrative for each year of the program period.

•    Signed completed SF-424.

In addition, proposal submissions to PRM should include the following information:

•    Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.

•    To increase PRM’s ability to track the impact of PRM funding, include specific information on locations of projects and beneficiaries (GPS coordinates if possible).

•    Proposals should outline how the NGO will acknowledge PRM funding. If an organization believes that publicly acknowledging the receipt of USG funding for a particular PRM-funded project could potentially endanger the lives of the beneficiaries and/or the organization staff, invite suspicion about the organization’s motives, or alienate the organization from the population it is trying to help, it must provide a brief explanation in its proposal as to why it should be exempted from this requirement.

•    The budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other USG agencies, other donors, and your own organization. PRM strongly encourages multilateral support for humanitarian programs.

•    In FY 2014, PRM is asking applicants whose proposals address gender-based violence (GBV) through their projects to estimate the total cost of these activities as a separate line item in their proposed budgets. PRM’s budget template document has been updated to reflect this new requirement.

•    Gender analysis (See above. Required before an award can be made).

•    Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made).

•    Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

•    Proposals and budgets should include details of any sub-agreements associated with the program.

•    Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

•    NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number.

•    Organizations that received PRM funding in FY 2013 for activities that are being proposed for funding under this announcement must include the most recent quarterly progress report against indicators outlined in the cooperative agreement. If an organization’s last quarterly report was submitted more than six weeks prior to the submission of a proposal in response to this funding announcement, the organization must include, with its most recent quarterly report, updates that show any significant progress made on objectives since the last report.

Multi-Year Funding: Applicants proposing multi-year programs should adhere to the following guidance:

Applicants may submit proposals that include multi-year strategies presented in 12-month cycles for a period not to exceed 24 months from the proposed start date. Fully developed programs with detailed budgets, objectives and indicators are required for each year of activities. These can be updated yearly upon submission of continuation applications. Applicants should note that they may use PRM’s recommended multi-year proposal template for this application, which is different from the single year template. Multi-year funding applicants may also use PRM’s standard budget template and should submit a separate budget sheet for each project year. Multi-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 30 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 25 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total.

Multi-year applications selected for funding by PRM will be funded in 12- month increments based on the proposal submitted in the initial application as approved by PRM. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting continuation application and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. Continuation applications must be submitted by the organization no later than 90 days before the proposed start date of the new award (e.g., if the next project period is to begin on September 1, submit your application by June 1). Continuation applications are submitted in lieu of responding to PRM’s published call for proposals for those activities. Late continuation applications will jeopardize continued funding.

Organizations can request multi-year funding and continuation application templates by emailing PRM’s NGO Coordinator with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line.

Reports and Reporting Requirements:

Program reporting: PRM requires quarterly and final program reports describing and analyzing the results of activities undertaken during the validity period of the agreement. It is highly suggested that NGOs receiving PRM funding use the PRM recommended program report template. To request this template, send an email with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line to PRM’s NGO Coordinator.

Financial Reports: Financial reports are required within thirty (30) days following the end of each calendar year quarter during the validity period of the agreement; a final financial report covering the entire period of the agreement is required within ninety (90) days after the expiration date of the agreement.

For more details regarding reporting requirements please see PRM’s General NGO Guidelines.

Proposal Review Process: PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel will evaluate submissions based on the above-referenced proposal evaluation criteria and PRM priorities in the context of available funding.

PRM may request revised proposals and/or budgets based on feedback from the panel. PRM will provide formal notifications to NGOs of final decisions taken by Bureau management.

Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated bureau Authorizing Official as described in the proposal templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:

•    As a condition of receipt of this assistance award, all materials produced pursuant to the award, including training materials, materials for recipients or materials to communicate or promote with foreign audiences a program, event, project, or some other activity under this agreement, including but not limited to invitations to events, press materials, event backdrops, podium signs, etc. must be marked appropriately with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity. Subrecipients and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the recipient shall include a provision in the subrecipient agreement indicating that the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement. In the event the recipient does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action.

PRM Points of Contact: Should NGOs have technical questions related to this announcement, they should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. Please note that responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.

PRM Program Officer: Kristen Frost, FrostKL@state.gov, (202) 453-9383, Washington, D.C.

Regional Refugee Coordinator: Mary Eileen Earl, EarlME2@state.gov, (235) 22-51-70-09 ext. 4323, U.S. Embassy, N’Djamena.

 

SOURCE 

US Department of State

Posted by: africanpressorganization | 17 April 2014

On the Occasion of the Republic of Zimbabwe’s National Day


 

On the Occasion of the Republic of Zimbabwe’s National Day

 

WASHINGTON, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ Press Statement

John Kerry

Secretary of State

Washington, DC

April 17, 2014

 

On behalf of President Obama and the American people, I send best wishes to the people of Zimbabwe as you celebrate 34 years of independence on April 18.

The United States remains committed to the people of Zimbabwe. We will continue to support all Zimbabweans as you seek a more democratic, prosperous, and healthy future.

We look forward to strengthening our partnership with the Zimbabwean people to achieve our common goals of peace, security, and prosperity.

 

SOURCE 

US Department of State


 

AU PSC, at its 429th meeting held on 16 April 2014, adopted a decision on the situation in Guinea Bissau

 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ The Peace and Security Council of the African Union (AU), at its 429th meeting held on 16 April 2014, adopted the following decision on the situation in Guinea Bissau:

Council,

1. Takes note of the briefing provided by the Director for Political Affairs of the AU Commission on the post-election situation in Guinea Bissau. Council also takes note of the statement made ??by the Representative of Ghana, in its capacity as the Chair of Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS);

2. Recalls its previous communiqués and press statements on the situation in Guinea Bissau, in particular communiqués PSC/AHG/BR/1(CCCXCVII), adopted at its 397th meeting, held at the level of Heads of State and Government, in New York, on 23 September 2013, and PSC/PR/COMM.1(CDVIII) of 13 December 2013;

3. Expresses its deep appreciation to the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), notably Nigeria and the ECOWAS Commission for developing an elaborate package of assistance to the Electoral Management Bodies (EBMs) in Guinea Bissau, in particular, the Technical Support Agency for the Management of the Electoral Process (GTAPE) which greatly facilitated the successful holding of Presidential and Legislative elections in Guinea Bissau on 13 April 2014. Council welcomes the peaceful atmosphere in which the elections took place in a free, fair and transparent manner;

4. Further expresses its appreciation to the AU Commission and the AU Election Observation Mission (AUEOM), which was led by former President Joaquim Chissano of Mozambique, for its support to Guinea Bissau and its people, which has significantly contributed towards the completion of the transition. Also expresses its appreciation to the international partners for providing support to the election process in Guinea Bissau and appeals to them to continue to support Guinea Bissau to emerge from the crisis;

5. Commends the political parties, independent candidates and the people of Guinea Bissau for signing a consensual code of conduct and abiding by its provisions to allow the electoral process to take place in a calm and peaceful environment throughout the electioneering campaigns;

6. Welcomes the progress made in Guinea Bissau’s transitional process, a country with a long history of unconstitutional changes of government which have greatly weakened the country’s democratic institutions. Council acknowledges that the general elections of 13 April 2014 mark a significant step towards the full restoration of constitutional order in Guinea Bissau;

7. Calls on political parties, independent candidates and the people of Guinea Bissau to continue to remain calm and to allow the electoral process to be completed in accordance with the Constitution of Guinea Bissau. Council warns all potential spoilers not to undermine the ongoing electoral process in the country and stresses that spoilers of the process will be held accountable for their actions;

8. Decides, in the light of the successful holding of Presidential and Legislative elections in Guinea Bissau on 13 April 2014, that upon announcement of the presidential winner and assumption of office by the new President in accordance with the Constitution of Guinea Bissau, the country will be invited to resume its participation in the AU’s activities in line with paragraph 6 of communiqué PSC/PR/COMM(CCCXVIII) adopted by the PSC at its 318th meeting of 17 April 2012;

9. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

 

SOURCE 

African Union Commission (AUC)


 

AU PSC, at its 429th meeting, held on 16 April 2014, was briefed on the upcoming elections in Egypt

 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ The Peace and Security Council of the African Union (AU), at its 429th meeting, held on 16 April 2014, was briefed on the upcoming elections in Egypt by the Department of the Political Affairs of the AU Commission.

Council took note of the briefing. Council recalled all its legal instruments on unconstitutional changes of government, as well as its communiqué PSC/AHG/COMM.3(CDXVI) on the situation in Egypt, adopted at its 416th meeting held on 29 January 2014, and agreed to review the overall situation in Egypt following the presentation of the report to be submitted by the AU High-Level Panel for Egypt.

Council further encouraged the Department of Political Affairs to continue its engagement in support of democratization efforts in Africa.

Council agreed to remain seized of the matter.

 

SOURCE 

African Union Commission (AUC)


 

A ASLM anuncia a 2a Conferência Internacional; Pedido de envio de resumos

 

A ASLM2014 será realizada na Cidade do Cabo, África do Sul, entre 30 de novembro e 4 de Dezembro de 2014

 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ A importância da pesquisa laboratorial e a qualidade no diagnóstico não pode ser exagerada, especialmente numa altura em que o continente africano enfrenta enfrenta diversos surtos de doenças. As oportunidades para divulgar resultados de pesquisa para um público global estão disponíveis unicamente para os cientistas, pesquisadores e formuladores de políticas africanos na segunda conferência internacional da Sociedade Africana de Medicina Laboratorial (ASLM – African Society for Laboratory Medicine), http://www.ASLM2014.org.

Logo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/aslm.jpg

 

A conferência da ASLM, ASLM2014, constitui uma plataforma para a comunidade laboratorial mundial partilhar as suas melhores práticas, adquirir conhecimentos e debater formas inovadoras de abordar os principais desafios de saúde. O tema da conferência é “Inovação e Integração de Sistemas Laboratoriais e Clínicos: Reformando o Futuro do VIH, tuberculose (TB), malária, influenza, doenças tropicais negligenciadas e Patógenos Emergentes em África.”

 

O envio de resumos permanece aberto até 30 de abril de 2014.

 

A ASLM2014 será realizada na Cidade do Cabo, África do Sul, entre 30 de novembro e 4 de Dezembro de 2014, e servirá para sublinhar os esforços pan-africanos da ASLM na melhoria da qualidade dos cuidados aos pacientes e controlo de doenças através de sistemas e redes laboratoriais melhorados em África.

 

“Os laboratórios têm um papel estratégico na segurança da saúde global,” afirmou o Dr. Tsehaynesh Messele, Diretor Executivo da ASLM. “Partilhar as melhores práticas permite que a comunidade de saúde africana capitalize o movimento histórico para melhorar a eficiência laboratorial, reduzir custos e desenvolver uma capacidade local sustentável. Através de eventos como a ASLM2014, podemos expandir o nosso conhecimento e explorar novos territórios de forma a defender o papel fundamental e o avanço da medicina laboratorial em África.”

 

Para saber mais sobre a segunda conferência internacional da Sociedade Africana de Medicina Laboratorial, visite http://www.ASLM2014.org.

 

Distribuído pela APO (African Press Organization) em nome da ociedade Africana de Medicina Laboratorial (ASLM).

 

 

Contacto para os meios de comunicação: Corey White, cwhite@aslm.org, (+251) 11-557-1021

 

SOURCE 

African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM)


 

La société africaine pour la médecine de laboratoire (ASLM) annonce sa 2ème conférence internationale – Appel à présentations

 

L’ASLM2014 se tiendra au Cap (Afrique du Sud) du 30 novembre au 4 décembre 2014

 

ADDIS ABEBA, Ethiopie, 17 avril 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ L’importance d’une recherche et de diagnostics de laboratoire de qualité ne saurait être surestimée, en particulier au moment même où l’Afrique fait face à des épidémies. L’opportunité de porter les résultats de la recherche sur le devant de la scène mondiale s’offre de manière unique aux scientifiques, chercheurs et décideurs africains lors de la deuxième Conférence internationale de la société africaine pour la médecine de laboratoire (ASLM). Pour plus de détails, visitez le site http://www.ASLM2014.org.

 

Logo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/aslm.jpg

 

La conférence ASLM2014 est une plateforme destinée à partager les règles de bonne pratique, acquérir des connaissances et débattre d’approches innovantes avec la communauté mondiale des laboratoires afin de relever les défis majeurs sur le plan sanitaire. Ce symposium s’articule autour du thème : « Innovation et intégration des systèmes cliniques et de laboratoire : reconsidérer l’avenir du VIH, de la tuberculose, du paludisme, de la grippe, des maladies tropicales négligées et des pathogènes émergents en Afrique ».

 

La soumission des présentations demeure ouverte jusqu’au 30 avril 2014. 

 

L’ASLM2014 se tiendra au Cap (Afrique du Sud) du 30 novembre au 4 décembre 2014 et aura pour objectif de mettre en évidence les efforts de l’ASLM menés au niveau panafricain pour élever le niveau de qualité des soins aux patients et du contrôle des pathologies grâce à une amélioration des systèmes et réseaux de laboratoires en Afrique.

 

« Les laboratoires jouent un rôle stratégique dans la sécurité sanitaire mondiale », estime le Dr Tsehaynesh Messele, directeur général de l’ASLM. « Le partage de règles de bonne pratique permet à la communauté africaine de la santé de miser sur les évolutions historiques pour accroître l’efficacité des laboratoires, abaisser les coûts et développer des capacités locales durables. Grâce à des événements tels que l’ASLM2014, nous pouvons approfondir nos connaissances et explorer de nouveaux territoires afin de promouvoir le caractère essentiel du rôle et des avancées de la médecine de laboratoire en Afrique ».

 

Pour en savoir plus sur la deuxième Conférence internationale de la société africaine pour la médecine de laboratoire, consultez le site http://www.ASLM2014.org.

 

Distribué par APO (African Press Organization) pour la African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM).

 

 

Contacts médias : Corey White, cwhite@aslm.org, (+251) 11-557-1021

 

SOURCE 

African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM)


 

Pierre Buyoya réitère l’engagement de l’UA lors d’une visite de courtoisie au nouveau Premier ministre malien

 

BAMAKO, Mali, 17 avril 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ M. Pierre Buyoya, Haut représentant de l’Union africaine (UA) pour le Mali et le Sahel et Chef de la Mission de l’UA pour le Mali et le Sahel (MISAHEL) a rendu le 16 avril courant, une visite de courtoisie au nouveau Premier ministre de la République du Mali, M. Moussa Mara, nommé à ce poste le 5 avril 2014.

Au nom de la Présidente de la Commission de l’UA, M. Buyoya a d’abord adressé ses félicitations au nouveau Premier ministre pour la confiance que le Chef de l’Etat malien vient de placer en lui. « La tâche est lourde, mais vos qualités de leader et de gestionnaire vous permettront d’être à la hauteur de cette mission exaltante, » a dit M. Buyoya. Il a ensuite rappelé l’engagement de l’UA depuis le début de la crise malienne et a réitéré la disponibilité de l’organisation continentale à continuer à œuvrer dans ce sens afin d’aider le Mali à retrouver la paix et la stabilité dans un climat de cohésion nationale et de prospérité socioéconomique, notamment à travers la mise en œuvre de la Stratégie de l’UA pour la région du Sahel.

Pour sa part, M. Mara a exprimé sa satisfaction pour cette visite et a apprécié, à sa juste valeur, le soutien inestimable que l’UA a apporté au Mali durant ce moment d’épreuve, et s’est réjouit de pouvoir compter sur son engagement continu. Evoquant le processus de paix dans le pays, M. Mara a indiqué qu’un comité interministériel sera très prochainement mise en place, appuyé par une équipe multidisciplinaire, pour coordonner les actions du gouvernement. Une personnalité sera également désignée pour piloter les négociations avec les mouvements armés. Il a souligné l’importance d’une approche globale pour résoudre les problèmes au nord du Mali, comprenant à la fois des mesures politiques et sécuritaires.

 

SOURCE 

African Union Commission (AUC)


 

Orange celebrates the 10 millionth Orange Money customer

 

Orange Money is now available in 13 countries

 

DAKAR, Sénégal, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ Stéphane Richard, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Orange (http://www.orange.com), gave a bonus to the 10 millionth customer of Orange Money in Dakar, Senegal: Ms Kanny G., who had gone to an Orange Money outlet to open an account, was surprised to learn that she had won a smartphone with an Orange Money credit of 100,000 FCFA (152 euros).

Logo : http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/orange-logo.jpg

 

Photo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/index.php?level=picture&id=999 (Stéphane Richard (on the right), Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Orange, gave a bonus to the 10 millionth customer of Orange Money in Dakar, Senegal)

 

“Orange Money is a revolution in terms of customer experience, and the appeal of this service is the best proof that we made the right choice when we decided to offer mobile payment services in 2008. I am very proud to be in Dakar today to meet our 10 millionth Orange Money customer. While making a strong contribution to economic and social development, mobile financial services also represent a major growth engine in Africa and the Middle East as well as in Europe for Orange,” said Stéphane Richard.

 

Orange Money has seen exponential growth since it was launched. The service is now available in 13 countries: Botswana, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt (under the name Mobicash), Guinea, Jordan, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritius, Niger, Senegal and Uganda. In 2013, more than 2.2 billion euros in transactions were conducted through Orange Money. The ten million mark has just been hit, and in some countries, such as Côte d’Ivoire, more than 40% of all Orange customers have an Orange Money account.

 

The success of the Orange Money service is closely linked to that fact that it meets strong expectations by people in Africa and the Middle East. It adapts to lifestyles in countries where only a minority of inhabitants have bank accounts yet the majority have a mobile phone. It makes life easier for users every day by giving them a way to keep their money safe or by saving time on all of their transactions.

 

Subscription to Orange Money is free of charge. After opening their accounts, customers have access to three types of services:

 

-          money transfers, allowing them to send and receive money by phone;

 

-          easy remote payment for goods and services, whether to pay bills from partner companies (e.g. water, electricity or TV service) or to buy airtime;

 

-          financial services enabling them to wire money to and from a bank account, pay wages, etc.

 

Orange Money is a major source of innovation for the Group, which is broadening its offer by developing an ecosystem of services and partnerships. For example, Orange recently launched several flagship projects:

 

-          Orange Money International Transfer for mobile-to-mobile money transfers between Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Senegal, which has achieved a market share of 15% in a matter of months;

 

-          a partnership with Visa in Botswana, giving Orange Money subscribers easy access to new transaction options at Orange outlets, online and in licensed vending machines;

 

-          a partnership being deployed with Total on distribution and merchant payment in service stations for greater access to Orange Money.

 

A number of other projects are planned for 2014: the opening of additional corridors for international transfers, the creation of services for customers with bank accounts, and the development of new interfaces for smartphones, which are becoming more widespread. Moreover, the Group is continuing its efforts to build up its distribution network, especially in the most remote regions, as proximity is a key success factor for Orange Money.

 

Orange’s ambition is to support the anticipated growth of the mobile payment market in the coming years. The Group also plans to expand its range of affordable financial and banking services and give as many people as possible access to them. Its objective is to turn them into indispensable services in the years to come, just as voice services, text-messaging and Internet access are today.

 

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Orange.

 

 

Press contacts:

France

01 44 44 93 93

Mylène Blin, mylene.blin@orange.com

Tom Wright, tom.wright@orange.com

 

UK

Vanessa Clarke

vanessa.clarke@orange.com

+44 (0)7818 848 848

 

About Orange

Orange (http://www.orange.com) is one of the world’s leading telecommunications operators with sales of 41 billion euros in 2013 and has 165,000 employees worldwide at 31 December 2013, including 102,000 employees in France. Present in 30 countries, the Group has a total customer base of more than 236 million customers at 31 December 2013, including 178 million mobile customers and 15 million broadband internet customers worldwide. Under the Orange Business Services brand, Orange is also one of the world leaders in providing telecommunication services to multinational companies.

 

Orange is listed on NYSE Euronext Paris (ORA) and on the New York Stock Exchange (ORAN).

 

For more information (on the web and on your mobile): www.orange.com, www.orange-business.com, www.orange-innovation.tv or to follow us on Twitter: @presseorange.

Orange and any other Orange product or service cited in this press release are trademarks held by Orange or Orange Brand Services Limited.

 

SOURCE 

Orange


 

Rencontre du Vice-Ministre Zhang Ming avec le Directeur général Asie-Océanie du Ministère algérien des Affaires étrangères

 

BEIJING, Chine, 17 avril 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ Le 11 avril 2014, le Vice-Ministre Zhang Ming a rencontré au Ministère le Directeur général Asie-Océanie du Ministère algérien des Affaires étrangères Mohammed El-Amine Derragui. Les deux parties ont procédé à des échanges de vues sur le développement du partenariat stratégique global sino-algérien et la 6e Conférence ministérielle du Forum sur la coopération sino-arabe.

 

SOURCE 

China – Ministry of Foreign Affairs


 

Orange célèbre le 10 millionième client Orange Money

 

Depuis son lancement, Orange Money enregistre une croissance exponentielle

 

DAKAR, Sénégal, 17 avril 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ A l’occasion d’un voyage à Dakar au Sénégal, Stéphane Richard, Président Directeur Général d’Orange (http://www.orange.com), a récompensé le 10 millionième client Orange Money. Kanny G., venue ouvrir un compte dans un point de vente Orange Money, a eu la surprise de gagner un smartphone associé à un compte Orange Money crédité de 100 000 FCFA (152 €).

Logo : http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/orange-logo.jpg

 

Photo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/index.php?level=picture&id=998
(A l’occasion d’un voyage à Dakar au Sénégal, Stéphane Richard (à droite), Président Directeur Général d’Orange, a récompensé le 10 millionième client Orange Money)

 

«Orange Money révolutionne les usages et le fort attrait de nos clients pour ce service est la preuve que notre choix de nous engager, dès 2008, dans le déploiement du paiement mobile était particulièrement judicieux. Je suis donc très fier de rencontrer le 10 millionième client d’Orange Money aujourd’hui, à Dakar. Les services financiers sur mobile, tout en contribuant fortement au développement économique et social, représentent  pour Orange un axe de croissance majeur en Afrique, au Moyen-Orient, mais aussi en Europe. » a déclaré Stéphane Richard.

 

Depuis son lancement, Orange Money enregistre une croissance exponentielle. Le service est aujourd’hui disponible dans 13 pays : au Botswana, au Cameroun, en Côte d’Ivoire, en Egypte (sous le nom de Mobicash), en Guinée, en Jordanie, au Kenya, à Madagascar, au Mali, à l’Ile Maurice, au Niger, au Sénégal et en Ouganda. En 2013, le montant des transactions effectuées par l’intermédiaire d’Orange Money a dépassé 2,2 milliards d’euros. Le seuil des dix millions de clients vient d’être franchi, et dans certains pays comme en Côte d’Ivoire plus de 40% des clients Orange ont un compte Orange Money.

 

Le succès du service Orange Money est lié au fait qu’il répond à des attentes fortes de la part des populations d’Afrique et du Moyen-Orient. Il apporte une évolution structurante des modes de vie, dans des pays où les comptes bancaires sont réservés à une minorité d’habitants alors que la majorité d’entre eux possède un téléphone mobile. Au quotidien, il facilite la vie des utilisateurs en leur permettant par exemple de mettre leur argent en sécurité ou de gagner du temps dans toutes leurs transactions.

 

La souscription à Orange Money est gratuite. Une fois son compte ouvert, le client accède à trois types de services :

 

-          le transfert d’argent, qui permet d’envoyer et de recevoir de l’argent depuis son téléphone ;

 

-          le paiement de biens et services, qui permet notamment de régler à distance les factures de partenaires (eau, électricité et abonnement TV par exemple) et d’acheter facilement du crédit de communication ;

 

-          les services financiers, qui rendent possibles les virements depuis et vers un compte bancaire, les versements de salaires, etc.

 

Orange Money constitue un levier majeur d’innovation pour le Groupe, qui développe un écosystème de services et de partenariats permettant d’enrichir son offre. Ainsi, Orange a lancé récemment plusieurs projets phares :

 

-          le transfert d’argent de mobile à mobile entre la Côte d’Ivoire, le Mali et le Sénégal, Orange Money Transfert International, qui a atteint en quelques mois 15% de part de marché ;

 

-          un partenariat avec Visa au Botswana, qui permet aux abonnés Orange Money de ce pays d’accéder facilement à de nouvelles options de transactions dans les points de vente, en ligne et dans les distributeurs automatiques agréés ;

 

-          un partenariat en cours de déploiement avec Total sur la distribution et le paiement marchand dans les stations-services, pour une plus grande accessibilité du service Orange Money.

 

De nombreux autres projets sont prévus pour l’année 2014 : l’ouverture de corridors supplémentaires de transfert international, la mise en place de services adaptés aux clients bancarisés et le développement de nouvelles interfaces destinées aux smartphones, dont l’usage se démocratise. En outre, le Groupe continue ses efforts pour étoffer son réseau de distribution notamment dans les régions plus éloignées, la proximité étant un facteur-clé de succès pour Orange Money.

 

Orange a pour ambition d’accompagner l’accroissement du marché du paiement mobile attendu dans les années à venir. Le Groupe compte étendre sa gamme de services financiers et bancaires accessibles à faibles coûts et au plus grand nombre. Son objectif est de rendre ces services incontournables dans les années à venir, au même titre que le sont aujourd’hui les services de voix, le sms et l’accès à Internet.

 

Distribué par APO (African Press Organization) pour Orange.

 

 

Contacts presse : +33 1 44 44 93 93

Mylène Blin, mylene.blin@orange.com

Tom Wright, tom.wright@orange.com

 

à propos d’Orange

Orange (http://www.orange.com) est l’un des principaux opérateurs de télécommunications dans le monde, avec un chiffre d’affaires de 41 milliards d’euros en 2013 et 165 000 salariés au 31 décembre 2013, dont 102 000 en France. Présent dans 30 pays, le Groupe servait plus de 236 millions de clients au 31 décembre 2013, dont 178 millions de clients du mobile et 15 millions de clients haut débit fixe dans le monde. Orange est également l’un des leaders mondiaux des services de télécommunications aux entreprises multinationales sous la marque Orange Business Services.

 

Orange est coté sur le NYSE Euronext Paris (symbole ORA) et sur le New York Stock Exchange (symbole ORAN).

Pour plus d’informations (sur le web et votre mobile) : www.orange.com, www.orange-business.com, www.orange-innovation.tv ou pour nous suivre sur Twitter : @presseorange.

Orange et tout autre produit ou service d’Orange cités dans ce communiqué sont des marques détenues par Orange ou Orange Brand Services Limited.

 

SOURCE 

Orange


 

Programme ONUCI/UNMAS de sécurisation des stocks de munitions : 06 soutes à munitions remises aux autorités ivoiriennes

 

ABIDJAN, Côte d’Ivoire, 17 avril 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ La Représentante spéciale du Secrétaire général des Nations Unies pour la Côte d’Ivoire, Mme Aïchatou Mindaoudou et le Ministre auprès du Président de la République chargé de la Défense, Paul Koffi Koffi, ont présidé, mercredi 16 avril 2014, à la base militaire d’Akouedo, la cérémonie d’inauguration des sites de stockages de munitions d’Akakro, d’Akouédo, de Bouaké, de Daloa, de Séguéla et de Yamoussoukro.

 

En prenant la parole, Mme Mindaoudou a souligné que cette cérémonie se situait dans le cadre de l’accompagnement de l’Opération des Nations Unies en Côte d’Ivoire (ONUCI) aux autorités nationales en matière de protection des populations civiles et qu’à cet effet, le Service de lutte anti-mines de l’ONUCI (UNMAS) avait assuré la mise en œuvre ces six (6) sites qui font partie d’un lot de 78 bâtiments réhabilités et construits dans le cadre du programme d’UNMAS, pour un coût de près de 2.2 milliard de FCFA. Ce programme vise à doter la Côte d’Ivoire de sites de stockages d’armes et de munitions répondants aux normes internationales.

 

«Les nouvelles soutes à munitions que nous inaugurons aujourd’hui permettront de sécuriser 5.4 million de kilogrammes du stock national de munitions. La sécurisation d’un tel stock de munitions évite les conséquences dangereuses des explosions accidentelles et tout accès non contrôlé aux dépôts. Ces soutes facilitent aussi la lutte contre la prolifération illicite d’armes et de munitions », a expliqué la Chef de l’ONUCI.

 

Afin de garantir une gestion et une sécurisation adéquate des stocks de munitions, ce projet a été accompagné de mesures de renforcement des capacités sur la gestion et sécurité des stocks de munitions selon les normes internationales en vigueur, le déminage, la Neutralisation, l’Enlèvement et la Destruction des Engins Explosifs (NEDEX), la dépollution de zone de combats.

 

Pour sa part, le Ministre auprès du Président de la République chargé de la Défense, Paul Koffi Koffi a remercié l’ONUCI au nom du Gouvernement ivoirien pour la réhabilitation de quatre sites et la construction de deux autres, venant ainsi réduire les risques pour l’armée et pour les populations. « Ce vaste programme répond aux exigences de la réforme du Secteur de la Sécurité (RSS). Le Gouvernement s’y est engagé et nous sommes particulièrement sensibles au soutien que vous apportez dans cette dynamique », a-t-il dit. Le Ministre Koffi Koffi a également tenu à rendre un hommage appuyé à 15 sapeurs du 1er bataillon du Génie de Bouaké qui ont réussi à effectuer le déminage de la poudrière d’Akouédo de juillet 2013 à fin février 2014 sans qu’aucun incident ne soit déploré. Trois parmi eux ont été décorés au grade de Chevaliers dans l’Ordre du mérite ivoirien tandis que 12 autres ont reçu la médaille des Forces armées. Par ailleurs, M. Zana Coulibaly, agent d’UNMAS – Allo Trust a reçu un diplôme de reconnaissance de sa dextérité dans le déminage, la neutralisation et la destruction des armes.

La Représentante spéciale a, ensuite, remis les clés des soutes et du matériel à la Gendarmerie, à la Police et aux Forces républicaines de Côte d’Ivoire. La délégation officielle a pu visiter les soutes à munitions et une exposition photos des différentes étapes de la réalisation du projet.

 

Le Colonel Assamoi Djessou, qui a été un acteur majeur dans ce processus a été félicité par le Représentante spéciale. Il a expliqué en quoi a consisté sa contribution. «Nous avons fait l’audit de tous les sites existant et méthodiquement nous avons commencé à travailler, à faire des stockages provisoires et à proposer à l’ONUCI des sites de stockage définitifs. C’est l’UNMAS qui est vraiment la cheville ouvrière et qui a formé nos hommes au déminage», a-t-il dit.

Le chef d’État-major Général des Forces Républicaines de Côte d’Ivoire (FRCI), le Général Soumaïla Bakayoko, n’a pas manqué de manifester sa joie de recevoir ces soutes à munitions. « Vous savez très bien que nous ne disposions pas d’infrastructures adaptées pour garder nos munitions. Aujourd’hui grâce à l’ONUCI, à l’UNMAS, nous venons d’acquérir des soutes modernes qui nous permettent de stocker toutes les catégories de munitions, du petit calibre au gros calibre. Cela nous permet de mettre à l’abri nos populations», s’est réjoui le Général Bakayoko.

 

SOURCE 

NATIONS UNIES


 

FCO Press Release: Foreign Secretary condemns abduction of school girls in northern Nigeria

 

LONDON, United-Kingdom, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ Foreign Secretary appalled by the abduction of up to 100 school girls in northern Nigeria, offers UK help.

 

Reacting to the abduction, Foreign Secretary William Hague said:

 

“I am appalled by the abduction of up to 100 school girls in Borno State, in northern Nigeria. My thoughts and deepest sympathies are with them, and with their families.

 

I condemn this cowardly act and those responsible for it. We stand ready to provide assistance to help the Nigerian government ensure that these children can be returned to their families in safety, and to bring to justice those responsible.

 

This attack follows other reports of Boko Haram’s abduction of women and girls, the barbaric murder of schoolchildren and the use of sexual violence. There is no possible justification for such callous acts, that intentionally target the most vulnerable people in the cruellest way.

 

The UK is a firm ally and friend of the people of Nigeria and we will continue to offer staunch support and assistance as they combat the threat posed by Boko Haram, and address the wider issues raised by this attack.”

 

SOURCE 

United Kingdom – Ministry of Foreign Affairs


 

African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM) Announces 2nd International Conference; Call for Abstracts

 

ASLM2014 will be held in Cape Town, South Africa, on 30 November – 4 December 2014

 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ The importance of laboratory research and quality diagnostics cannot be overstated, especially at a time when Africa is challenged by disease outbreaks. Opportunities to publicise research findings among a global audience are uniquely available to African scientists, researchers and policymakers at the second international conference of the African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM), http://www.ASLM2014.org.

Logo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/aslm.jpg

 

The ASLM conference, ASLM2014, is a platform for the global laboratory community to share best practices, acquire knowledge and debate innovative approaches for tackling major health challenges. The conference theme is “Innovation and Integration of Laboratory and Clinical Systems: Reshaping the Future of HIV, Tuberculosis (TB), Malaria, Influenza, Neglected Tropical Diseases and Emerging Pathogens in Africa.”

 

Abstract submission remains open until 30 April 2014.

 

ASLM2014 will be held in Cape Town, South Africa, on 30 November – 4 December 2014, and it will serve to highlight ASLM’s pan-African efforts to improve quality patient care and disease control through improved laboratory systems and networks in Africa.

 

“Laboratories play a strategic role in global health security,” said Dr. Tsehaynesh Messele, ASLM Chief Executive Officer. “Sharing best practices allows the African health community to capitalise on the historical movement to improve laboratory efficiency, lower costs and develop sustainable local capacity. Through events such as ASLM2014, we can expand our knowledge and charter new territory to advocate for the critical role and advancement of laboratory medicine in Africa.”

 

To learn more about the second international conference of the African Society for Laboratory Medicine, visit http://www.ASLM2014.org.

 

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of the African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM).

 

 

Media contact: Corey White, cwhite@aslm.org, (+251) 11-557-1021

 

SOURCE 

African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM)


 

Côte d’Ivoire / Le contingent Jordanien (JORBATT 15) reçoit la médaille des Nations Unies des mains de la Représentante spéciale

 

ABIDJAN, Côte d’Ivoire, 17 avril 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ « C’est un plaisir pour moi de vous remettre, au nom du Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies, cette médaille en reconnaissance de votre remarquable contribution au processus de paix en Côte d’Ivoire. Vous illustrez le modèle parfait de ce que recommande la charte des Nations Unies » : c’est ce qu’a déclaré la Représentante spéciale du Secrétaire général des Nations Unies pour la Côte d’Ivoire et Chef de l’Opération des Nations Unies en Côte d’Ivoire (ONUCI), Mme Aïchatou Mindaoudou, en remettant, ce mardi 15 avril 2014 à Abidjan, la médaille des Nation Unies à 849 Casques bleus du contingent Jordanien de la force de l’ONUCI (JORBATT 15).

 

La Chef de l’ONUCI les a exhortés à accomplir le mandat du Conseil de sécurité par leur professionnalisme et leur dévouement effectif et constant. « Je suis plus que confiante que vous continuerez à travailler avec acharnement à la consolidation de la paix et de la sécurité en Côte d’Ivoire », leur a-t-elle dit.

 

Pour la Représentante spéciale, la remise de la médaille des Nations Unies aux Casques bleus était la reconnaissance de leur dévouement, leur professionnalisme et leur contribution à la réalisation de la paix partout dans le monde. « Je voudrais féliciter les récipiendaires et profiter de cette occasion pour adresser ma gratitude au contingent Jordanien. Les Nations Unies attachent un grand prix aux efforts accomplis par ceux qui portent la tenue des Casques bleus pour la restauration de la paix et de la sécurité dans le monde », a fait savoir Mme Mindaoudou. Selon la Représentante spéciale, cette médaille avait pour objectif de motiver le contingent Jordanien à continuer à travailler inlassablement pour accomplir les nobles objectifs des Nations Unies que constituent la paix et la sécurité.

 

La Représentante spéciale a, par ailleurs, demandé aux Casques bleus jordaniens de se souvenir de ceux qui sont tombés sur le champ d’honneur au service de la paix. « Quoique ce jour soit un jour de réjouissance, nous devons l’utiliser pour rendre hommage à nos collègues qui ont perdu leur vie au service de la paix », a-t-elle déclaré.

 

Mme Mindaoudou a rappelé que les forces armées jordaniennes contribuaient de façon significative aux opérations de paix dans le monde. « Leur participation à la mission de la paix a commencé en 1989 en Angola. Aujourd’hui, elles servent au Liberia, en République Démocratique du Congo, en Haïti, au Darfour et au Sud Soudan. Les JORBATT et les JOCOY sont arrivés respectivement en 2006 et 2005. Ils ont prouvé leur engagement à travers les soutiens médicaux, l’assistance aux populations et la provision de la paix pendant les périodes électorales », a-t-elle encore fait savoir.

 

Pour sa part, le Brigadier général Taha-Al-Aqeel, Commandant du secteur Abidjan a affirmé que son contingent était honoré de participer à la mission de maintien de la paix sous les auspices des Nations Unies. « Cette organisation est en train de faire des efforts considérables à travers le monde pour permettre à tous de vivre dans la paix… L’armée jordanienne n’hésitera pas à faire son noble devoir pour apporter aide et protection aux faibles », a-t-il conclu.

 

SOURCE 

NATIONS UNIES


 

Conférence de presse de l’Experte indépendante chargée de la situation des Droits de l’Homme en République centrafricaine

 

BANGUI, République Centrafricaine, 17 avril 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ A l’issue de sa seconde visite en République centrafricaine, du 10 au 19 avril 2014, l’Experte indépendante chargée de la situation des Droits de l’Homme en République centrafricaine, Mme Marie Thérèse Keita Bocoum, animera une conférence de presse.

Quand ?

Jeudi 17 avril 2014 à 15:00

Où ?

Salle de conférence de la MINUSCA

Siège de la Mission : Bangui

PK4, Avenue Barthélémy Boganda

 

SOURCE 

NATIONS UNIES


 

Le sénateur Larry Smith soulignera l’appui du Canada aux initiatives de réduction de la pauvreté au Ghana

 

OTTAWA, Canada, 16 avril 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ L’honorable Larry Smith, sénateur (Québec–Saurel), soulignera l’appui du Canada pour des modes de subsistance durables et des programmes sur la santé au Ghana, lors d’une allocution au campus Macdonald de l’Université McGill.

M. Smith annoncera un partenariat de programmation entre le gouvernement du Canada et l’Université McGill et parlera du soutien à d’autres initiatives sur la sécurité alimentaire au Ghana.

DATE : Le jeudi 17 avril 2014

 

HEURE : 10 h 30

 

LIEU : Édifice Macdonald-Stewart, pièce MS2-022

Université McGill, campus Macdonald

21111, chemin Lakeshore

Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Québec

 

SOURCE 

Canada – Ministry of Foreign Affairs


 

Senator Larry Smith to highlight Canada’s support for poverty-reduction efforts in Ghana

 

OTTAWA, Canada, April 16, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ The Honourable Larry Smith, Senator (Québec – Saurel), will highlight Canada’s support for sustainable livelihoods and health programming in Ghana, during an address at McGill University’s Macdonald Campus.

During the address, Senator Smith will make an announcement about a programming partnership between the Government of Canada and McGill University, and highlight support for other food-security initiatives in Ghana.

DATE: Thursday, April 17, 2014

 

TIME: 10:30 am

 

LOCATION: Macdonald Stewart Building, Room MS2-022

McGill University, Macdonald Campus

21111 Lakeshore Road

Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec

 

SOURCE 

Canada – Ministry of Foreign Affairs


 

Statement by the Press Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, on the bombing incident in the outskirts of Abuja, Nigeria

 

TOKYO, Japan, April 16, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ 1. The Government of Japan deeply regrets the bombing incident in the outskirts of Abuja, Nigeria on April 14, 2014, which caused many casualties. Japan expresses its deep condolences for those who have been killed and the bereaved families, and also extends its heartfelt sympathy to those wounded in the incident.

 

2. Terrorism cannot be justified on any ground or for any purpose. The Government of Japan firmly condemns every act of terrorism.

 

3. Japan strongly hopes that the Government of Nigeria and its people overcome ethnics and religious differences, and continue making efforts toward the stabilization of the security situation.

 

SOURCE 

Japan – Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Posted by: africanpressorganization | 16 April 2014

Didier Reynders condamne l’attaque lâche contre Emmanuel de Mérode en RDC


 

Didier Reynders condamne l’attaque lâche contre Emmanuel de Mérode en RDC

 

BRUXELLES, Royaume de Belgique, 16 avril 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ Le Vice-Premier Ministre et Ministre des Affaires étrangères, Didier Reynders, a appris avec consternation l’attaque lâche dont Emmanuel de Mérode a fait l’objet le 15 avril dans l’après-midi sur la route entre Goma et Rumangabo dans l’Est de la République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) et au cours de laquelle il a été blessé par balles.

 

Emmené à l’hôpital Heal Africa de Goma, Emmanuel de Mérode a subi une opération à laquelle ont également pris part deux chirurgiens de la Mission de l’Organisation des Nations-Unies pour la stabilisation en RDC (MONUSCO). Selon les premières informations reçues, son état de santé est stable. Le ministre lui souhaite un prompt rétablissement.

 

Nommé en août 2008 par l’Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN), Emmanuel de Mérode est le Directeur du Parc National des Virunga situé dans l’Est de la RDC. Son travail, son expertise et son engagement sont unanimement reconnus. Premier parc naturel d’Afrique et connu notamment pour les gorilles des montagnes et les okapis qu’il abrite, le Parc des Virunga est classé au patrimoine mondial de l’UNESCO. Il est aussi un des parcs les plus menacés au monde.

 

Didier Reynders invite les autorités congolaises à mettre en œuvre tous les moyens nécessaires pour faire la lumière sur cette attaque et en identifier le plus rapidement possible les auteurs. La Belgique suivra de près la progression de l’enquête.

 

SOURCE 

Belgium – Ministry of Foreign Affairs

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